Posts tagged ‘Drug Free Treatment of ADD’

Return of School Problems for ADHD Children?

I was speaking with the mother of several school age children recently (one with ADHD), and she gave voice to a feeling I suspect many mothers have. “The kids are back in school, Thank God; I love my kids-but I need a little time at home alone to regroup…….. The kids are back in school. Oh my God! We’re going to start having all those school struggles with Alex again!” Does this sound familiar?

Many parents may have felt optimistic that with summer school, some tutoring, or because it’s a new year and the child is older, that this year would be an entirely new experience. Unfortunately, for most kids with ADHD, this is not the case. Individuals with ADHD have a unique handicap. It is a neurological disorder that, if untreated, will usually persist throughout life, typically creating significant difficulties in school, the workplace, and in relationships.

The classroom environment- with its particular emphasis on organization, schedules, and assignments, long periods of desk work, and emphasis on writing and math- are usually places where children with ADHD have significant difficulty. Furthermore, they take longer to complete in-class and homework assignments. They can quickly become overwhelmed, rebellious, and discouraged, and can “turn off” to the idea of learning.

Some children with ADHD also have behavior difficulties and/or may become isolated, or have difficulty forming friendships. These problems, combined with the aforementioned performance difficulties, often add up to the child developing a self-image of being “not to smart” (tragically incorrect, most people with ADHD have a higher than average intelligence), and/or being a “trouble-maker”. Unfortunately, as we all tend to live out our self-images, the longer this is allowed to exist, the stronger and greater the problems become. It is therefore critical to correct this situation immediately.

Solution:

The solution to this problem is to correct the disorder.Many parents, unfortunately, deny the existence of the disorder, or choose to not get help for their child because they fear the side effects, and rigors of medication (life-long treatment).There is, however, an alternative to this scenario.Neurofeedback is a highly effective, drug free, safe, non-invasive and painless procedure in which the student learns to correct the problem.Once training is complete, no further treatment is necessary.

Dr. Stephen A. Ferrari
Alta Neuro-Imaging Neurofeedback
1075 Yorba Place
Suite 105
Placentia, CA 92870
714.990.6536
Website: www.ocbiofeedback.com
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September 12, 2008 at 1:39 am Leave a comment

“Next Year Will Be Better”- Using Summertime to make that come true for children with ADD/ADHD

If you have a child (or an adult) in your family who has, or you suspect may have this disorder, the conflict, chaos, and frustration that it generates can be so disrupting to family harmony that you may sometimes wonder if it will ever get any better! Helping the individual with this disorder not only can turn the world around for them, but can work wonders for the whole family.

Children have a natural sense of optimism and innocence about them that allows them to genuinely feel that problems will naturally get better (even when there is no real reason to believe so) on their own. This optimism can be heard when they say “Things will be better next year”, or “I’ll get off to a good start next school year”.

There are few things more magical for a child’s self confidence than when something actually does happen to change the circumstances and bring that about. An actual increase in their abilities to concentrate and/or improve their behavior, combined with the then evident validation of their optimism, “Look, see I was right, I am doing better, I am smart!”, brings about a surge of confidence that is wonderful to see. A child in this situation can really take off and soar!

Not only is summertime the pause between the old and the (better?) New Year, it is a relatively less hectic time of the year. Schedules (vacations notwithstanding) are more flexible, the pressures of school and homework are loosened, and it is a time to more easily accomplish a special project.

The way to actually change the ADD child’s circumstances or abilities is to take this time to correct the disorder. This can be done in this space of time through Neurofeedback Training. Neurofeedback is a safe, effective, non-drug procedure that corrects the underlying imbalances which bring about ADD. Once the training is complete, no further treatment is necessary, and you know what?….your child actually was right to believe in themselves, next year actually is better.

Neurofeedback is an effective, drug-free, painless procedure in which the child learns to re-train the attention mechanisms of the brain, alleviating the condition. Once training is completed, no further treatment is necessary.

Dr. Stephen A. Ferrari
Alta Neuro-Imaging Neurofeedback
1075 Yorba Place
Suite 105
Placentia, CA 92870
714.990.6536
Website: www.ocbiofeedback.com

June 13, 2008 at 4:04 am Leave a comment

“Running Out of Gas” in School

About this time of year (if it hasn’t happened already), children with ADHD (ADD) begin to “run out of gas” at school. They are past the high point of Christmas, summer seems a long way off, and they’ve been working at school for over six months. After all, they’re kids. Often, they start to struggle and misbehave, and grades can decline.

This dilemma can become catastrophic for students with ADHD. They have been “running” much harder to keep up than their classmates have, and consequently are much more worn out than they are. An additional problem is the “foundation problem”, which refers to the tiered or sequential nature of education. As children move throughout the course of the school year, and progress from year to year, new concepts and understandings are built on the foundations of the previous ones. ADD often causes children to miss some of the key concepts of subjects. Then, when the teacher moves on to the next concept or set of facts, the child struggles with comprehening the new ideas because they are based on the previous ones, which they didn’t fully understand in the first place. This problem is of cumulative nature, and as school progresses, the lack of understanding increases and becomes overwhelming. Also increasing are the frustration, loss of confidence, and motivation… equally powerful in sabotaging the child’s success at school.

What makes matters worse are that these school programs may influence other areas of life, such as friendships and family life. Furthermore, the parents working with the child becomes exhausted too. This causes further “snow-balling” problems for the child and other members of the family!

The final piece of this dilemma is that at certain times in the education process, the teaching style, responsibility required of the student, or level of thinking required, take a big step up in difficulty. This may occur at fairly standard intervals, such as first, third, and sixth grade, middle school, high school, and college. But, with the increasing diversity in school programs and curriculum, it’s hard to know when these transitions will occur. This is often “the straw that breaks the camel’s back” for children with ADD.

Solution:
The solution is to correct the disorder. Unfortunately, many parents deny the existence of the disorder, or choose to not get help for their child because they fear the side effects and/or rigors of medication. There is, however, an alternative. Neurofeedback is a highly effective, drug-free, safe, non-invasive, and painless procedure in which the student learns to correct the problem. Once training is complete, no further treatment is necessary.

Dr. Stephen A. Ferrari
Alta Neuro-Imaging Neurofeedback
1075 Yorba Place
Suite 105
Placentia, CA 92870
714.990.6536
Website: www.ocbiofeedback.com

April 16, 2008 at 9:39 pm Leave a comment

Early Treatment of ADD Arrests Worsening of Learning and Behavior Problems – Dr. Stephen A. Ferrari

The degree of Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) present in a person, unless treated, usually remains relatively stable throughout their lives. However, to most people, the disorder appears to get worse as the years go by, especially while in school or advancing in a career. The reason for this lies in three important factors.

First, as each advancing school year increases in the intellectual and behavioral demands it makes on the student, the attention and /or behavior problems caused by this disorder become more and more apparent.

Secondly, each school year builds on the foundation of the preceding years. If a child’s attention and/or behavioral problems interfere with the learning of this foundational material, it becomes increasingly difficult, each year, to master the required material. Tutoring may help, however, that learning is also hampered by this disorder, and it is often a catch-up effort that never quite manages to sufficiently fill the gap.

Finally, and in some ways most importantly, is the matter of self-image. The child who suffers under these deficits usually forms a self-image of being “not too smart” (the opposite is true, most children with ADD have a higher than average intelligence) and/or a “trouble-maker”. Children (as well as adults) have a tendency to “act out” or to fulfill their self-image. The longer they live under that self-image the stronger it becomes, and performance and behavior often deteriorate accordingly.

These same factors usually apply to job and carrier advancement, and come to bear significantly in forming and maintaining adult relationships as well.

Since all of these elements can make the problem worse with each passing year, if your child, or a child you know has or is suspected of having ADD the sooner they are evaluated and/or treated the better.

One method of treatment is neurofeedback, an effective, drug free, painless procedure in which the child learns to re-train the attention mechanisms of their brain, alleviating the condition. Once training is completed, no further treatment is necessary.

To request information on the treatment of Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD, ADHD), Mild to Moderate Autism Spectrum Disorders, Sleep Disorders, Chronic Depression, Chronic Anxiety, and Peak Performance Training contact:

Dr. Stephen A. Ferrari
Alta Neuro-Imaging Neurofeedback
1075 Yorba Place
Suite 105
Placentia, CA 92870
714.990.6536
Website: www.ocbiofeedback.com

January 28, 2008 at 4:59 am Leave a comment

Notes Sent Home From The Teacher – Dr. Stephen A. Ferrari

 

It is rarely good news when your child’s teacher sends home a note for the parents. As you reluctantly open this note (often not the first from this teacher), a number of thoughts run through your mind (usually of the “oh no, not again” variety).

There are a number of ways to respond to this note. Unfortunately common, but unproductive are to become angry at the child, ignore the note, or blame the teacher (possibly, but not the most likely cause). There are, fortunately, a number of very good, productive ways to respond.

  1. Calmly share the note with your child, get their input.
  2. Thank the teacher (some will not take the time to tell parents until it’s too late), clarify the problem, tell them of your efforts, and get their advice.
  3. Share this information with your child.
  4. If unsure of child’s motivation, provide consistent, immediate, significant rewards for improvements verified by the teacher (rewards are 8 times more effective than punishments, and there is no anger or resentment).

If these efforts are unsuccessful, consider that the problems are due to a deeper cause.

First check to see if your child understands what is being taught. If not, consider vision and hearing problems, and or tutoring. Consider emotional problems at home or school. If these conditions do not seem to be present, the problem may be Attention Deficit Disorder (often referred to by schools as a “Learning Disorder”).

Some of the comments, which may be present in a teacher’s notes to parents or progress reports, which may indicate ADD, are:

  • Trouble paying attention
  • Blurts out answers
  • Loses school supplies
  • Impatient
  • Trouble finishing classwork
  • Always on the go
  • Forgets to turn in homework
  • Talks too much and has difficulty playing quietly
  • Doesn’t listen
  • Fidgets or squirms

There are two effective forms of treatment for this disorder, medication and neurofeedback. Medication is often effective, however, there are frequently unwanted side effects and this treatment is usually life-long. Neurofeedback is an effective alternative to medication.

To request information on the treatment of Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD, ADHD), Mild to Moderate Autism Spectrum Disorders, Sleep Disorders, Chronic Depression, Chronic Anxiety, and Peak Performance Training contact:

Dr. Stephen A. Ferrari
Alta Neuro-Imaging Neurofeedback
1075 Yorba Place
Suite 105
Placentia, CA 92870
714.990.6536
Website: www.ocbiofeedback.com

January 24, 2008 at 5:10 pm Leave a comment

ADD: Common in Girls Too Often overlooked by teachers and parents – Dr. Stephen A. Ferrari

The stereotype most of us have of ADD (or ADHD) is a boy, running around the classroom (or the house), disrupting the class, as well as his own learning. As with most stereotypes, this image does more harm than good, and in fact, causes more than half of the cases of ADD to be missed. There are three sub types of ADD; inattentive, hyperactive-impulsive, and the combined form.

The stereotype referred to above obviously does not include the quietly underachieving, underestimated (inattentive type) boy with ADD. What is even more of a problem is it leaves out girls entirely.

For years, it was believed that only boys suffered from ADD. However, a growing body of research -and a greater awareness on the part of parents, teachers and doctors – is finding that ADD is quite common among girls too.

Part of this shift in recognizing this disorder in girls is societal, and part is due to a growing appreciation of symptom manifestation differences. As our society has become more equal (less sexist) in terms of expectations for both boys and girls, under achievement in girls is, thankfully, becoming less acceptable. We now know that, individual differences aside, boys and girls possess equal capabilities for learning and performance in most categories. Therefore, the inattentive (unfortunately, sometimes referred to as “scatterbrained” or “flighty”) girl deserves just as much attention and help as her male counterpart, regardless of the subject matter.

The second part of the problem is symptom manifestation differences. Girls tend (not always) to manifest hyperactivity-impulsivity verbally. Excessive and inappropriate talking is often the female equivalent to a boy’s more physical hyperactivity-impulsivity. A secondary symptom of ADD can sometimes be depression. Girls with ADD can have a hard time reading social clues (boys too). They can be disliked because they are socially aggressive and disruptive. Inattentive girls become socially isolated. Girls tend to internalize performance, behavior, and social problems more readily than boys. Therefore, these problems easily become things that are “wrong” with them, and this often results in depression. Many girls with ADD are misdiagnosed with depression, and to make matters worse, the ADD goes untreated.

These unequal and unfair social misconceptions, and symptom differences tend to, unfortunately, cause under diagnosis among girls still today. However, the problem is being corrected as more parents and professionals shed the misleading stereotypes and evaluate the difficulties these girls are having.  An equal opportunity for all the help we can give them is what they truly deserve.

One such method of treatment is neurofeedback, an effective, drug free, painless procedure in which the patient learns to retrain the attention mechanisms of the brain, alleviating the condition. Once training is completed, no further treatment is necessary.

To request information on the treatment of Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD, ADHD), Mild to Moderate Autism Spectrum Disorders, Sleep Disorders, Chronic Depression, Chronic Anxiety, and Peak Performance Training contact:

Dr. Stephen A. Ferrari
Alta Neuro-Imaging Neurofeedback
1075 Yorba Place
Suite 105
Placentia, CA 92870
714.990.6536
Website: www.ocbiofeedback.com

January 24, 2008 at 6:11 am Leave a comment

Maximum Performance for Children With ADD – Dr. Stephen A. Ferrari

In keeping with the spirit of health and optimizing our capabilities, let’s talk a little about maximizing performance (and enjoyment) for children with ADD.

We have found that a three-pronged approach to this matter usually works best.

The most obvious way to accomplish this would be to correct the disorder completely. Many parents feel that this cannot be done, are opposed to the side effects and rigors of lifelong medication, or are afraid of the stigma that labeling a child with this disorder often brings. In most cases, ADD can be corrected and all of the above concerns avoided. More on that later.

Secondly, a specific approach in dealing with the school should be adopted. Parents of children who struggle with ADD often (somewhat understandably) avoid contact with the school, dread parent-teacher conferences, and may have resigned themselves to this situation as inevitable. What actually works best and is less painful is a proactive approach. The parent who takes the initiative in helping the teacher work with their child usually assures particularly positive, patient, and focused attention for their child. This not only protects the child’s self-esteem (all important), but can also help secure whatever special accommodations or assistance the child needs. Helping the teacher a little with the class, staying in frequent contact with and being supportive of the teacher will go a long way to help their child.

The third part of our approach involves enhancing structure and motivation in the home. Scheduling homework, chores, and play is very helpful to the child with ADD. The more structured and specific this is, the better. Immediate rewards for specifically defined (how well and when done) performance are very effective. For the child with social skill difficulties, structuring of playtime with friends can be very helpful too.

Finally, in regards to our first point, ADD, with proper treatment can in most cases be corrected. As to stigma and labeling, results of testing and treatment performed in a private facility are confidential; rendering this problem eliminated entirely. Although medication is what is most often first suggested, there is a very successful alternative to this form of treatment.

One method of treatment is Neurofeedback, a non-drug, painless, side effect-free procedure in which the person learns to re-train the attention mechanisms of the brain, alleviating the condition. Once the treatment is complete, no further training is necessary.

To request information on the treatment of Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD, ADHD), Mild to Moderate Autism Spectrum Disorders, Sleep Disorders, Chronic Depression, Chronic Anxiety, and Peak Performance Training contact:

Dr. Stephen A. Ferrari
Alta Neuro-Imaging Neurofeedback
1075 Yorba Place
Suite 105
Placentia, CA 92870
714.990.6536
Website: www.ocbiofeedback.com

January 16, 2008 at 5:16 am Leave a comment

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